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Paul van Dyk Attacks Madonna's 'Molly' Reference

Producer says singer made 'worst mistake of her career'

March 30, 2012 8:35 AM ET
paul van dyk
Paul van Dyk performs at Pacha in New York.
Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images

Electronic dance music star Paul van Dyk has told Billboard that Madonna's drug reference in her appearance at the Ultra Music Festival last weekend is "the biggest mistake of her career." The pop star made a surprise cameo at the event to introduce headliner Avicii, asking the audience "How many people in this crowd have seen Molly?," a slang term for seeking ecstasy.

"I don't think she was thinking much," the producer said. "The only thing she was probably thinking was, 'I need to connect with a young crowd,' and she made the biggest mistake of her career." Van Dyk echoed the sentiment of fellow EDM star Deadmau5, who attacked the singer in a series of tweets earlier this week. "Madonna was so stupid to actually call out drug abuse in front of a crowd of 18-year-olds," says van Dyk. "This is not what our music is about. It's really counterproductive."

Madonna responded to Deadmau5 on Twitter, insisting that she does not support drug use and claiming the comment was actually a reference to the song "Have You Seen Molly" by Cedric Gervais, with whom she wanted to work on her latest album, MDNA.

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