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Paul McCartney, U2, Bruce Springsteen Join Call for Pussy Riot's Release

Adele, Radiohead, Madonna and Sting also sign Amnesty International open letter

Paul McCartney, Bono of U2, Bruce Springsteen.
Rick Kern/Getty Images; Kevin Winter/American Idol 2011/Getty Images; Matt Kent/Getty Images
July 22, 2013 10:45 AM ET

Paul McCartney, U2 and Bruce Springsteen are among dozens of artists who have signed an open letter with Amnesty International calling for Pussy Riot's release. The organization told The Associated Press that more than 100 musicians have joined the cause, which also includes Adele, Radiohead, Madonna, Yoko Ono, Patti Smith, Sting and Ke$ha. The group notes in the letter that the effects of Pussy Riot's "shockingly unjust trial and imprisonment has spread far and wide, especially among your fellow artists, musicians and citizens around the world."

Pussy Riot: Their Trial in Pictures

Pussy Riot members Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, 23, and Maria Alyokhina, 25, are still imprisoned in Russia after receiving two-year sentences last August for their roles in a punk protest against Russian President Vladimir Putin in a Moscow Cathedral in February 2012. Alyokhina went on hunger strike in May and was denied parole; she later ended her hunger strike. A third group member, Yekaterina Samutsevich, 30, was freed on appeal last October.

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“Santa Monica”

Everclear | 1996

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