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Paul McCartney Leaves Guitar Pick at Elvis Presley's Grave

Ex-Beatle visited Graceland as 'Out There' tour hit Memphis

May 28, 2013 8:05 AM ET
 Paul McCartney perfoms in Austin, Texas.
Paul McCartney perfoms in Austin, Texas.
Rick Kern/Getty Images

Paul McCartney paid his respects by leaving a personalized guitar pick on Elvis Presley's grave over the weekend during the former Beatle's first visit to Graceland.

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As the North American leg of his "Out There" tour rolled through Memphis, McCartney toured Graceland Sunday, The Associated Press reports. McCartney tweeted a photo of himself holding the guitar pick as he leaned over the wrought-iron fence in front of Presley's headstone, and another of him cradling an acoustic guitar with Presley's name inlaid on the fretboard.

McCartney met Presley once with the Beatles in Los Angeles in 1965, and the Beatles played a pair of shows in Memphis in 1966. McCartney's performance at FedEx Forum there was his first visit to the city in 20 years. 

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