Patti Smith Plots 'Just Kids' Memoir Adaptation Series for Showtime

Network president David Nevins also announces Jim Carrey-produced pilot based on 1970s comedy scene, talks 'Twin Peaks' revival

Showtime has ordered a limited series based on rocker Patti Smith's 2010 memoir, 'Just Kids' Credit: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty

Rock legend Patti Smith is teaming with Showtime for a limited series adaptation of her 2010 memoir, Just Kids. Showtime president David Nevins announced the project Tuesday during the Television Critics Assocation's summer press tour, noting that Smith will co-write and co-produce the series with Penny Dreadful creator John Logan, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Just Kids, which won a National Book Award in the nonfiction category, focuses on Smith's relationship with late photographer Robert Mapplethorpe during the late Sixties and early Seventies – and features stories of her encounters with pop culture giants like Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin and William Burroughs. In 2011, Smith reportedly began collaborating with Logan on a screenplay for a film version

"A limited series on Showtime will allow us to explore the characters more deeply, enabling us to develop stories beyond the book and allow a measure of unorthodox presentation," Smith said in a statement. "The medium of a television limited series offers narrative freedom and a chance to expand upon the themes of the book." 

Nevins also announced a pilot order for I'm Dying Up Here, an hour-long dark comedy co-executive-produced by Jim Carrey, Dave Flebotte (Will & Grace), Michael Aguilar (The Departed) and Christina Wayne (Copper), focusing on the complexities of L.A.'s iconic 1970s stand-up comedy scene. The pilot will be directed by Jonathan Levine (50/50) and is based on William Knoedelseder's 2009 novel of the same name.

The Showtime executive also offered some cryptic but intriguing updates on the Twin Peaks revival, which faced an uncertain future when director-mastermind David Lynch briefly bowed out following budget disputes. Nevins says production will begin in September, mostly in the state of Washington, Deadline reports, with Lynch approaching the project as one big movie. "I expect [the series] to be more than nine [episodes]," Nevins said. "It's open-ended. I know his shooting schedule. We will let him cut into however many episodes he feels works best."