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Paramore's Hayley Williams on Guns, Girl Groups and Great Bands

August 28, 2012 3:06 PM ET

In RS1047, contributing editor Jenny Eliscu spoke to Paramore frontwoman Hayley Williams about lyrical inspiration, Williams' evolving taste ('NSync to New Found Glory) and how to properly soundtrack a make-out session. Here are some outtakes from their conversation. Plus: click here to take a peek at the hunting gear, Cocoa Puffs, tiny instruments and other items inside Paramore's tour bus.

Williams on Paramore's Tennessee Roots:
I don't know too much about guns. I want to get a little revolver, and the guys have shotguns, but all I know is that it's fun to be a little hillbilly sometimes. I mean, you grow up in the country and everyone's got a gun. Before I had one, I had a BB gun. My brother and I would just kind of go out in the woods and shoot leaves. Now we're just out there to shoot targets and relax. We go out in the country and shoot these little clay disks that you whip into the air — it looks kind of like you're throwing a Frisbee off a stick. It's a good time.

Williams on Female-Fronted Acts:
I always enjoy when I can tell that guys are in the crowd and enjoying the music — I know we're not the most testosterone-driven music out there right now, and it's a good feeling because I don't listen to a lot of music that girls like, so I get excited when guys appreciate our music. It's the same kind of feeling that you get when a band you love gives you a compliment and you can tell it's genuine.

I'm not really into female vocalists, at least not in our world right now. I don't think I would ever listen to our band, honestly. I love our music. When Josh brings music for me to write to him, I go, "Oh, my gosh. This is amazing." But I doubt I would find myself singing along. Maybe, I would enjoy the melodies, but I don't think I would like my voice.

Three Key Acts:

The Temptations: I grew up with everything from classic rock to the Temptations and a lot of soul music. My grandfather listened to a lot of Motown and old school — like, R&B and a lot of Elvis, so I really loved the fact that 'NSync was five-part harmony.

Copeland: The first real show that I think I ever went to was Copeland and they were playing with a band called Celebrity. There were probably 200 kids there at this little room in Nashville called the End. We were there every weekend seeing bands like Love Drug and Copeland and Celebrity. There was a time where Copeland came to the End three times in one month, and I was there at every show. It was amazing. I still miss those days, because it was such a growing time for me, just hearing new music all the time.

Eisley: I love Eisley's new record. They're friends of ours, and it started out just me wanting to support them, so I bought the record. And then, I was like, "Holy — this is amazing." The song that opens the record, "Many Funerals," makes me cry. They totally stepped it up more than a few notches for this record.

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