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Paramore, Muse Lead VMA Noms for Best Rock Video

MGMT, 30 Seconds to Mars and Florence and the Machine round out category for MTV's September 12th show

August 3, 2010 11:04 AM ET

Green Day walked away with the award for Best Rock Video at last year's MTV Video Music Awards, and today Rolling Stone can exclusively reveal who's in the running for the Moonman at the 2010 ceremony, which goes down September 12th in Los Angeles. 30 Seconds to Mars' nine-minute epic "Kings and Queens" is up against Muse's post-apocalyptic nightmare "Uprising," MGMT's British-culture tribute "Flash Delirium," Paramore's nightmarish "Ignorance" and Florence and the Machine's arty "Dog Days Are Over." British pop star Florence also scored nominations for Video of the Year, Best Art Direction and Best Cinematography. To gear up for this year's VMAs, check out clips of the nominees below and leave your pick for the winner in the comments:

Look back at the '09 VMAs' most memorable moments, from the Michael Jackson tribute to Kanye's stage invasion.

30 Seconds to Mars' "Kings and Queens"

Muse's "Uprising"

MGMT's "Flash Delirium"

Paramore's "Ignorance"

Florence and the Machine's "Dog Days Are Over"

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Song Stories

“Santa Monica”

Everclear | 1996

After his brother and girlfriend both died of drug overdoses, Art Alexakis -- depressed and hooked on drugs himself -- jumped off the Santa Monica Pier in California, determined to die. "It was really stupid," said the Everclear frontman, who would further explore his personal emotional journey in the song "Father of Mine." "I went under the water. Then I said, 'I don't wanna die.'" The song, declaring "Let's swim out past the breakers/and watch the world die," was intended as a manifesto for change, Alexakis said. "Let the world do what it's gonna do and just live on our own."

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