Search Warrants from Prince's Death Unsealed

Documents from investigation following singer's death describe depth of Prince's battle with addiction and withdrawal

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Search Warrants from Prince's Death Unsealed
Nearly a year after Prince died, search warrants from the singer's Paisley Park compound have been unsealed, providing some insight into his death.

Nearly a year after Prince died, search warrants from the singer's Paisley Park compound have been unsealed, providing some insight into his unexpected death at the age of 57.

The search warrant, conducted less than a week after Prince's death, uncovered controlled substances – mainly painkillers that required a doctor's prescription – hidden throughout the compound, including stashed in vitamin containers.

The Star Tribune writes that one vitamin D bottle contained Ondansetron Hydrochloride, also known as Zofran, a medication sometimes used to lessen the side effects of opiate withdrawal.

According to the search warrant, investigators were "made aware by witnesses that were interviewed, that Prince recently had a history of going through withdrawals, which are believed to be the result of the abuse of prescription medicine."

NBC News reports that unspecified controlled substances were also found next to handwritten "U Got the Look" lyrics in a suitcase bearing the name "Peter Bravestrong," an often-used Prince alias. (The search warrants revealed that Prince's personal email address was PeterBravestrong@gmail.com.)

Both Prince's physician Dr. Michael Schulenberg and his longtime bodyguard and assistant Kirk Johnson admitted to facilitating the artist with some controlled substances – Schulenberg said one oxycodone prescription for Prince was made out to Johnson "for Prince's privacy" – but, at the time of the search warrant, investigators were unable to track the source of the powerful painkiller Fentanyl that Prince accidentally overdosed on.

A joint state and federal criminal investigation is still ongoing to find the source of the Fentanyl, since Prince was never prescribed that drug.

Investigators also found that "interviews with those who were at Paisley Park the morning Prince was found deceased have provided inconsistent and, at times, contradictory statements."

Johnson especially was inconsistent with his statements to police, saying he didn't know Prince was addicted to painkillers, even though he reached out to a noted rehabilitation clinic ays earlier regarding the singer's addiction. Johnson ultimately told investigators that Prince battled both addiction and withdrawal prior to his death.

To aid their investigation, authorities mined through Paisley Park email and cellphone records; however, Prince did not own a cell phone after he claimed he was hacked several years earlier.