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Ozzy Cancels European Tour

Hard rock legend suffering from tremor

October 15, 2003 12:00 AM ET

One week before he was to launch his European tour in Ireland, Ozzy Osbourne called off the twenty-one-date run on doctor's orders. Osbourne's physician advised him not to hit the road because of a worsening, involuntary tremor.

Osbourne spent three weeks in Boston to undergo medical tests for the condition, which he said "has become markedly worse over the last two years." Osbourne's physician, Dr. Allan H. Ropper, the Chief of Neurology at Caritas St. Elizabeth's Medical Center, said that Osbourne does not have Parkinson's disease, and that the tremors were being controlled with medication. "Unfortunately, one of the side effects of the medication is dry mouth," Ropper said, "which greatly impairs the voice."

Despite taking the precautionary route, Osbourne expressed disappointed in having to call off the dates, which had been rescheduled from an initial September launch. The tour was to feature his first U.K. arena shows in more than eight years. "I feel like I keep letting you all down, which breaks my heart," Osbourne said. "But you have my word that I will be over in the new year to complete my tour. I ask that you please hang in there with me as I promise that you will get the best Ozzy Osbourne show you've ever seen." The tour could be rescheduled as early as January.

Osbourne is resting at home with his family in Los Angeles.

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