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On the Cover: The Secret History of Bruno Mars

Get a first look at the next issue of Rolling Stone

April 24, 2013 11:30 AM ET
bruno mars cover 1182
Bruno Mars on the cover of Rolling Stone.
Theo Wenner

Bruno Mars makes his first appearance on the cover of Rolling Stone in our next issue. The Hawaiian-born star talks to senior writer Brian Hiatt about his 25-year history as an entertainer, which started when he began impersonating Elvis Presley in the family band at age two. Before he was even in kindergarten, Mars was leading the group in their hugely successful show in Hawaii, but when the band broke up Bruno's family struggled to pay the bills, and life as he knew it fell apart. "I wouldn't trade it for anything," he says. "Because I feel like I can enjoy this so much."

Video: Watch Bruno Mars' Exclusive 'Screen Test'

Mars kicks off an arena tour in late June, and his Number One single "When I Was Your Man" has been all over radio for months. Very reluctantly, he reveals that he wrote the song for his girlfriend, model Jessica Caban, when he worried he was losing her. They stayed together, and now Mars has difficulty playing the song. "You're bringing up all these old emotions again," he says. "It's just like bleeding!"

Look for the issue on stands and in the iTunes App Store this Friday, April 26th.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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