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On the Charts: Young Jeezy Fights Off NKOTB, Game and Slipknot

September 10, 2008 11:22 AM ET

The Big News: Thankfully for Young Jeezy, the actual recession didn't prevent his album The Recession from claiming the top spot with 260,000 copies sold. New Kids on the Block sit at a distant second with their reunion album The Block, which moved sold 95,000 units. The Game's LAX sank one spot down to three, Kid Rock's Rock N Roll Jesus slotted at four and last week's champ, Slipknot's All Hope Is Gone, dropped down to five.

Debuts: Metal act Underoath took the eight spot with their sixth album Lost in the Sound of Seperation, Christian singer Chris Tomlin worshipped his way to nine with Hello Love and Diddy underling Donnie Klang debuted at 19 with Just Like A Rolling Stone. Also noteworthy, Brian Wilson's That Lucky Old Sun grabbed 21 and actor Terrence Howard made his non-Hustle & Flow chart debut at 31 with Shine Throught It.

Last Week Heroes: Slipknot lost their slim hold on first place thanks in part to a 69% sales decrease. Other than that, the top ten stayed mostly unified, with the only drastic drop being Solange's Sol-Angel & The Hadley St. Dreams, which fell from nine down to 28. Lil Wayne's Tha Carter III also found itself teetering on the brink of falling out of the top ten, though Weezy's pants-dropping performance at the VMAs should give him a boost next week.

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Song Stories

“Hungry Like the Wolf”

Duran Duran | 1982

This indulgent New Romantic group generated their first U.S. hit with the help of what was at the time new technology. "Simon [Le Bon] and I, I think, had been out the night before and had this terrible hangover," said keyboardist Nick Rhodes. "For some reason we were feeling guilty about it and decided to go and do some work." Rhodes started playing with his Jupiter-8 synth, and then "Simon had an idea for a lyric, and by lunchtime when everyone else turned up, we pretty much had the song." The Simmons drumbeat was equally important to the sound of "Hungry Like the Wolf," as Duran Duran drummer Roger Taylor stated it "kind of defined the drum sound for the Eighties."

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