.

On the Charts: Usher Is Number One Despite Bieber Sales Burst

April 7, 2010 2:03 PM ET

Justin Bieber enjoyed just one week at Number One before his mentor Usher booted him from the Billboard 200's top spot with his own disc, Raymond V Raymond. While Raymond marks Usher's third consecutive Number One debut, its sales of 329,000 copies couldn't match 2004's Confessions (1 million-plus) and 2008's Here I Stand (443,000 copies) according to Nielsen SoundScan. Still, Raymond V Raymond was the third-highest selling debut of 2010 behind Lady Antebellum's Need You Now and Sade's Soldier of Love, Billboard reports.


Despite falling to Number Two in its second week, Bieber's My World 2.0 became the first album since the Beatles' 2000 disc 1 to improve on its Number One debut week numbers the following week — My World 2.0's sales rose 3 percent to 291,000 copies. Following the NOW 33 comp at Number Three, troublemaker Erykah Badu's New Amerykah Part Two: Return of the Ahnk debuted at Number Four with 110,000 copies, just slightly off Part One's 125,000 in 2008. Lady Antebellum's Need You Now rounded out the Top Five.


One more debut of note: Method Man, Ghostface Killah and Raekwon's Wu-Massacre team-up entered the charts at Number 12.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Road to Nowhere”

Talking Heads | 1985

A cappella harmonies give way to an a fuller arrangement blending pop and electro-disco on "Road to Nowhere," but the theme remains constant: We're on an eternal journey to an undefined destination. The song vaulted back into the news a quarter century after it was a hit when Gov. Charlie Crist used it in his unsuccessful 2010 campaign for the U.S. Senate in Florida. "It's this little ditty about how there's no order and no plan and no scheme to life and death and it doesn't mean anything, but it's all right," Byrne said with a chuckle.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com