.

Occupy Musicians Website Launches

Tom Morello, Lou Reed, Saul Williams among first signers

November 21, 2011 10:10 AM ET
tom morello occupy wall street
Tom Morello performs at the Occupy Wall Street protest in Zuccotti Park.
Griffin Lotz for RollingStone.com

Today marks the official launch of Occupy Musicians, a resource for musicians who support the Occupy Wall Street movement and its affiliated protests. Among the first signers: Tom Morello, Lou Reed and Laurie Anderson, Saul Williams, Talib Kweli, Jello Biafra, Amanda Palmer and Ian MacKaye and Guy Picciotto of Fugazi.

Organizers of the site will help coordinate performances at protest sites and host creative work by some of the artists. Occupymusicians.com is a companion project to Occupy Writers, Occupy Filmmakers and Occupy Comics, other virtual gathering places for creative-economy workers who wish to express their support of the protest movement. 

Related
Rockers Respond to Occupy Wall Street Eviction
Tom Morello: 'World Wide Rebel Songs'
Inside Occupy Wall Street

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Santa Monica”

Everclear | 1996

After his brother and girlfriend both died of drug overdoses, Art Alexakis -- depressed and hooked on drugs himself -- jumped off the Santa Monica Pier in California, determined to die. "It was really stupid," said the Everclear frontman, who would further explore his personal emotional journey in the song "Father of Mine." "I went under the water. Then I said, 'I don't wanna die.'" The song, declaring "Let's swim out past the breakers/and watch the world die," was intended as a manifesto for change, Alexakis said. "Let the world do what it's gonna do and just live on our own."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com