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Oasis' Liam Gallagher Buys Film Rights for Beatles Book

Frontman will tackle story of Apple Corps in 'The Longest Cocktail Party'

May 7, 2010 6:52 PM ET

Oasis have earned no shortage of Beatles comparison over the years, and now frontman Liam Gallagher is taking his love of the Fab Four to the next level: he has acquired the cinematic rights to the book The Longest Cocktail Party, which tells the behind-the-scenes story of the Beatles' Apple Corps. Gallagher's newly formed In 1 Productions confirmed today that they will develop and produce a feature film based on Richard DiLello's 1973 book that tracks the rise and near fall of the Beatles' famed record label. No release date for the film has been announced.

"This will be a film with humor and affection providing an insider's look at what it meant to be a young man caught up in the wild swirl of the music business, celebrities and the tail end of the swinging Sixties' in London," reads a statement from Gallagher's company. DiLello, who began working for Apple in 1968, witnessed firsthand the demise of the Beatles, which coincided with record company's financial struggles. The film, like the book, will likely focus more on Apple Corps than the Beatles themselves, though the breakup of the band factors largely in the story.

It remains unclear what role Gallagher will play on the film — if he'll serve as producer, writer or one of the Beatles. Oasis will be the subject of their own film, an upcoming documentary that includes fans' stories about their connection with the band and its music. As Rolling Stone previously reported, Noel Gallagher quit the band with "great relief" in August 2009.

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Song Stories

“Try a Little Tenderness”

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