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Notorious B.I.G.'s Children to Star in New Animated Series

'House of Wallace' will feature 16-year-old C.J. and 19-year-old T'yanna Wallace

Notorious B.I.G. at the 12th Annual MTV Awards
Catherine McGann/Getty Images
March 12, 2013 10:50 AM ET

Notorious B.I.G.'s children will star in a new animated series about the late rapper's recording studio. According to the Associated Press, House of Wallace features 16-year-old C.J. and 19-year-old T'yanna Wallace as they maintain the Brooklyn studio and defend it against a larger company. Notorious B.I.G. will appear in "spirit" and offer guidance to the youngsters as they hold down the studio. The show will also feature appearances from musical guests.

500 Greatest Albums of All Time: The Notorious B.I.G., 'Life After Death'

House of Wallace has yet to find a home, though a representative for the show from Ossian Media says they're in discussion with "a few serious networks." Notorious B.I.G., born Christopher Wallace, was killed by a drive-by shooting on March 9th, 1997. He was 24. His autopsy report was released last December and indicated that only one bullet killed the rapper, though he was shot four times.

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