Noel Gallagher Talks One Direction, Oasis Brawls on 'James Corden'

"It was pretty even towards the end," rocker says of his fights with brother Liam. "I did leave on a high, though"

Noel Gallagher expanded a bit on his recent comments to Rolling Stone about Zayn Malik during an interview with James Corden on The Late Late Show Monday night, telling the new host he still doesn't understand what prompted the singer to leave One Direction.

"They've only got, at most, five years left," Gallagher said of the band. "Just stand in the back, smoke weed, get laid and pick the check up." The musician did reiterate sound financial advice to go alongside his cheeky rockstar wisdom: "He should get himself a good accountant."

Corden then turned to Gallagher's own split with Oasis in 2009, which was far more tumultuous than Malik's departure from One Direction. Still, Gallagher grinned as he remembered the band's fallout during the V Festival that year and, several days later, walking out the door moments before Oasis was told it was time to take the stage for a gig in Paris.

Gallagher also casually recalled his "great" backstage fist fights with his brother Liam. When Corden asked who usually won, the rocker thought for a moment and said, "It was pretty even towards the end — I did leave on a high, though."

Elsewhere, Gallagher discussed his favorite American foods and deftly explained why a hot dog should technically be called a "hot dog sandwich": "I think you'll find meat in between two slices of bread," Gallagher noted. "A 'hot dog' is on its own — or it's a dog with a hat and sunglasses on."

Gallagher also took the stage with his band the High Flying Birds for a performance of "Lock All the Doors," a song that initially began as an Oasis track before Gallagher revamped it for his latest album, Chasing Yesterday.

Gallagher will continue to tour over the next couple of months, playing a combination of festivals, theaters and clubs. "The more that I do it, the more I'm really at home with it now," he told Rolling Stone about those smaller shows. "I can engage with the audience and we have a good laugh. So I prefer this now. It's a funny thing; I've grown."