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No Doubt Pull 'Looking Hot' Video After Offending Native Americans

'Being hurtful to anyone is simply not who we are'

Tom Dumont, Tony Kanal, Gwen Stefani and Adrian Young of No Doubt
Kevin Mazur/WireImage
November 4, 2012 12:02 PM ET

No Doubt has pulled down their video for "Looking Hot" almost immediately following the clip's release after learning that the imagery used the in the video was offensive to Native Americans.

The clip for the second single off their long-awaited new album, Push and Shove, featured a Wild-West theme, replete with tee-pees, feather headdresses and smoke signals. After releasing the video on Friday, No Doubt quickly drew complaints for using the stereotypical imagery, with threads such as "Appropriating Native American culture" appearing in their fan forums. The video has now been removed from YouTube and other official channels, though it can still be found elsewhere

No Doubt addressed the controversy on Saturday with an apology posted on their website:

"As a multi-racial band our foundation is built upon both diversity and consideration for other cultures. Our intention with our new video was never to offend, hurt or trivialize Native American people, their culture or their history. Although we consulted with Native American friends and Native American studies experts at the University of California, we realize now that we have offended people. This is of great concern to us and we are removing the video immediately. The music that inspired us when we started the band, and the community of friends, family, and fans that surrounds us was built upon respect, unity and inclusiveness.  We sincerely apologize to the Native American community and anyone else offended by this video. Being hurtful to anyone is simply not who we are."

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