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Nine Inch Nails Tap David Lynch to Direct 'Came Back Haunted' Video

Trent Reznor pairs with filmmaker for first time since 1997

David Lynch
Frazer Harrison/Getty Images
June 19, 2013 3:35 PM ET

Trent Reznor and David Lynch will team up for Nine Inch Nails' video for "Came Back Haunted," the first time the pair has collaborated since 1997's Lost Highway soundtrack. The glitchy track is the first single off NIN's upcoming album, Hesitation Marks, which will be out September 3rd on Columbia.

Readers' Poll: The 10 Best Nine Inch Nails Songs

Today, Reznor posted a photo of the duo on Twitter with a caption of their initials ("tr;dl") and Blackbook reported Lynch's involvement. It is shaping up to be a busy summer for both artists: Lynch will release his LP The Big Dream on June 16th, and Nine Inch Nails will hit the road with Godspeed You Black Emperor and Explosions in the Sky.

Back in 1997, Rolling Stone ran a cover story on the dark pair, with Reznor discussing his adoration for the director. "I’m a huge David Lynch fan – we used to hold up Nine Inch Nails shows just so we could watch the latest Twin Peaks. So we set up a weekend for him to come to my place in New Orleans," he said. "At first, it was like the most high-pressure situation ever. It was literally one minute, 'Hi, I'm David Lynch,' and he’s cooler than I even imagined he would be. Three minutes later, he's saying: 'Well, let’s go in the studio and get started.'" 

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