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Nine Inch Nails Prep 'With Teeth' Release May 3rd

Trent Reznor proves that his bite is as vicious as his bark, with a little help from Dave Grohl

March 10, 2005
Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails
Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails
J. Shearer/WireImage for Coming Home Studios, LLC.

"I had plenty of life experience to draw from while working on this record," says Nine Inch Nails mastermind Trent Reznor of his first studio album in six years. "I was getting sane while the world was going crazy." The follow-up to 1999's The Fragile bristles with as much aggression as anything in the NIN catalog while adding more live drumming into the mix, courtesy of honorary Nailsman Dave Grohl. "I wrote some of these tracks with a Grohl-esque performance in mind," says Reznor. "I asked him if he was into it and that was that." Stellar tracks include "Only," which boasts a "Billie Jean" beat and spoken-word vocals that evoke Prince, and "The Hand That Feeds" (the first single), which combines a guitar assault with New Wave-y keyboards, says Reznor, "This record is probably more honest than anything I've done."

"This record is probably more honest than anything I've done."

This story is from the March 10th, 2005 issue of Rolling Stone.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

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