.

Nikolai Fraiture & Au Revoir Simone Redo Mazzy Star's 'Fade Into You'

Strokes bassist teams with Brooklyn dream-poppers for brand-new cover

Au Revoir Simone, 'Fade Into You'
Courtesy of Au Revoir Simone
June 12, 2014 12:45 PM ET

You may have caught the Strokes' Nikolai Fraiture onstage at Governors Ball this past weekend (the band's anticipated set was one of the 30 Best Things We Saw), but the bassist has been keeping quite busy offstage, too. One of his most recent projects just hit the web: a bouncy remake of Mazzy Star's iconic wooze-fest "Fade Into You" with Brooklyn band Au Revoir Simone.

The New Immortals: The Strokes

"I saw Au Revoir Simone perform the song on kexp and had some ideas for how it could be recorded," Fraiture, who produced the song, tells Rolling Stone. "I love the band and met Erika Spring through some friends in New York.  I sent them a rough version of the track. They agreed to come into the studio to do vocals and sent in their keyboard parts while on tour. They each did just a few vocal takes but sounded great.

The "Fade" cover — which has a delightful, bouyant post-punk vibe — is a one-off team-up featuring Fraiture on bass and guitars. The crew recorded the song at Downtown Studios in New York in February during one of the city's epic blizzards. "It was a dream collaboration for us," Spring said.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Bird on a Wire”

Leonard Cohen | 1969

While living on the Greek island of Hydra, Cohen was battling a lingering depression when his girlfriend handed him a guitar and suggested he play something. After spotting a bird on a telephone wire, Cohen wrote this prayer-like song of guilt. First recorded by Judy Collins, it would be performed numerous times by artists incuding Johnny Cash, Joe Cocker and Rita Coolidge. "I'm always knocked out when I hear my songs covered or used in some situation," Cohen told Rolling Stone. "I've never gotten over the fact that people out there like my music."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com