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Nicki Minaj Opens Up on Childhood Abuse, Sexuality

The new queen of hip-hop also discusses her five-year plan in latest issue of Rolling Stone

December 1, 2010 10:25 AM ET

In the new issue of Rolling Stone, Nicki Minaj reveals that her ambition stems from a painful childhood. (Read the full story here.) "When I first came to America," she says, "I would go in my room and and kneel down at the foot of my bed and pray that god would make me rich so that I could take care of my mother." Minaj's father was a violent drug addict once set their house on fire while her mother was inside. She has no qualms about sharing these stories, even though her parents still live together and her father would prefer that she not share their history. "It's the price you pay when you abuse drugs and alcohol," she says. "Maybe one day your daughter will be famous and talk to every magazine about it, so think about that, dads out there who want to be crazy."

 

Photos: Nicki Minaj's Best Looks


Other highlights from the article:

• Early in her career Minaj claimed to be bisexual, but now says she just did that to get attention. "I think girls are sexy," she says. "But I'm not going to lie and say that I date girls."

• She's immensely proud of the fact that her and Drake are proving that rappers can come from any background. "At one point you had to sell a few kilos to be considered a credible rapper," she says. "But now it's like Drake and I are embracing the fact that we went to school, we love acting, we love theater, and that's ok — and it's especially good for the black community to know that's ok, that's embraced."

• Minaj has mapped out a five-year plan that includes a film career, a perfume line, a clothing line and possibly records that feature her singing as much as rapping. "There's this fear of not being perfect," she says. "There's some songs I just won't write because I'm afraid of not meeting my expectations of what I know that song could be. I don't compete with other people. I compete with myself."

Review: Pink Friday

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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Song Stories

“San Francisco Mabel Joy”

Mickey Newbury | 1969

A country-folk song of epic proportions, "San Francisco Mabel Joy" tells the tale of a poor Georgia farmboy who wound up in prison after a move to the Bay Area found love turning into tragedy. First released by Mickey Newbury in 1969, it might be more familiar through covers by Waylon Jennings, Joan Baez and Kenny Rogers. "It was a five-minute song written in a two-minute world," Newbury said. "I was told it would never be cut by any artist ... I was told you could not use the term 'redneck' in a song and get it recorded."

More Song Stories entries »
 
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