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Nick Cannon in 'Stable Condition' After Kidney Failure

Wife Mariah Carey predicts he'll leave hospital in two days

January 6, 2012 2:25 PM ET
Nick Cannon in 'Stable Condition' After Kidney Failure

Mariah Carey shared good news on Twitter this afternoon: her husband, Nick Cannon, is in stable condition after his recent episode of mild kidney failure. Carey tweeted, "Nick is in stable condition with a good prognosis, hopefully he'll be discharged within 2 days. As always he's laughing and in good spirits."

Ever the optimist, Carey also posted a photo of herself kissing the America's Got Talent host as he reclined in his hospital bed, surrounded by balloons and flowers.

Yesterday Cannon, 31,was transferred from a medical facility in Aspen, Colorado, to one in the couple's hometown of Los Angeles. He was hospitalized while vacationing with his family for what Carey disclosed as "mild kidney failure," the cause of which has not been disclosed. He took to his own Twitter account to say, "Currently being [transferred] to a hospital in LA. Thank you all for all your love, prayers and concern. You know me . . . I will be a'ight." A few hours later, he was clearly feeling better – he posted a photo of his haircut and also a party plug for his friend (and Tom Cruise's son), DJ Connor Cruise.

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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