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New World Punx Take a Dark Path on 'Romper' - Song Premiere

EDM giants Ferry Corsten and Markus Schulz unite in new project

New World Punx
Courtesy New World Punx Recordings
June 6, 2013 9:00 AM ET

Click to listen to New World Punx's "Romper"

There was no way the alliance of European EDM giants Ferry Corsten and Markus Schulz would be a small affair. The pair's inaugural show as New World Punx — a collaborative project inspired by their mutual love of early 1990s trance — was a major affair at Madison Square Garden in March. "It was a night beyond my wildest dreams," Schulz tells Rolling Stone.

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At Madison Square Garden, New World Punx debuted the sinister "Romper," which you can hear now. The track is noticeably darker than either artist's previous output; it's full of rhythmic twists, a mechanical raver that sputters into a minor-key gallop.

"We began working collectively in the studio, paying tribute to past rave classics," Schulz explains. "It's a throwback to those old, hard dance rave melodies. . . 'Romper' is one of those tracks where people just want to go crazy and party." Adds Corsten, "We had a right blast stepping out of our comfort zone."

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