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New U2 Songs Swiped

CD with unfinished material stolen in France

July 16, 2004 12:00 AM ET

A disc containing new U2 material has been swiped in the South of France, where the group has been doing post-production for its next record.

Guitarist Edge told the band's official Web site that it was his CD that was taken. "A large slice of two years work lifted via a piece of round plastic," he said. "It doesn't seem credible, but that's what's just happened to us."

The band recorded the follow-up to 2001's All That You Can't Leave Behind in Dublin and has been putting the finishing touches on the record in France. Edge believes the disc was taken while the group was off doing a photo shoot.

According to U2.com, French police are investigating the theft. So far the songs have yet to surface on the Internet. Said manager Paul McGuinness, "It would be a shame if unfinished work fell into the wrong hands."

Further details about U2's next record have been scant. A fall release is projected for the album (which includes production by Chris Thomas and Steve Lillywhite), and it is expected to contain the song "Tough," which frontman Bono wrote for his late father.

 

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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