.

New Oral History Celebrates Matador Records

Three-part series tells the history of the venerable label, just as the Matador 21 party kicks off in Las Vegas

October 1, 2010 4:37 PM ET

With Matador 21, the venerable indie label's anniversary bash, set for this weekend in Las Vegas, MySpace Music has created an oral history featuring Matador co-founders Gerard Cosley and Chris Lombardi, Liz Phair, Pavement's Bob Nastanovich and more. Part one covers the label's beginning and the success of Phair's Exile in Guyville and Pavement's Slanted & Enchanted; part two focuses on the label's cult artists, like the Fall and Unsane, and it's parterships with major labels. Part three is forthcoming.

Inside Matador Records' All-Star Birthday Bash

Matador vets Pavement, Sonic Youth, Guided By Voices (with their "classic lineup"), Spoon, Liz Phair, Cat Power, Belle & Sebastian, the New Pornographers, Yo La Tengo, Girls, Superchunk and countless more will all perform this weekend at the Palms — and Rolling Stone will be streaming all of the sets as they happen, plus shooting video on site, posting reviews by Rob Sheffield, and keeping you up-to-the-minute on all the news coming out of the event.

Keep up with rock's hottest photos in Random Notes

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com