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New Jersey Will Fly Flags At Half-Mast For Clarence Clemons

Governor Chris Christie pays tribute to the E Street Band sax legend

June 22, 2011 10:40 AM ET
 Clarence Clemons performs at the Meadowlands Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey.
Clarence Clemons performs at the Meadowlands Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey.
Al Pereira/WireImage

Flags in New Jersey will fly at half-mast tomorrow in tribute to E Street Band saxophonist Clarence Clemons, who died on Saturday from complications of a stroke.

"Clarence Clemons represented the soul and spirit of New Jersey," Governor Chris Christie said in a statement. "His partnership with Bruce Springsteen and the rest of the E Street Band brought great pride to our state and joy to every fan of this music around the world."

Remembering Clarence Clemons: His Life and Career in Photos

Christie, a longtime Springsteen fan, was personally affected by Clemons' death. "When I heard about the Big Man's passing on Saturday night, I was struck with an overwhelming feeling that the days of my youth were now finally over," Christie said. "My condolences to Clarence's family and all the members of the E Street Band."

RELATED:
E Street Band's Clarence Clemons Dies at 69
Bruce Springsteen on Clarence Clemons: 'His Loss is Immeasurable'

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