.

Neil Young's Biggest Fan Speaks: "His Voice Is Haunting," Says Donald Trump

December 18, 2008 10:45 AM ET

Two years ago we noticed the bizarre trio of Patti Smith, Salman Rushdie and Donald Trump rocking out to Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young in the first two rows of Madison Square Garden. Last year, the Donald was sitting upfront for Young's solo show at the United Palace Theater and on Monday Trump was again grooving to Neil at the Garden. We gave Trump a call yesterday to discuss.

"He's got something very special," Trump says. "I've listened to his music for years and I've seen him before that, but I went to the concert where they were honoring Bob Dylan years ago at Madison Square Garden [Bob Fest 10/16/92] and Neil got up and totally brought the house down. There was nobody close. He's performed for me at my casinos over the years and he just brings it down. I've met him on occasions and he's a terrific guy."

Does Trump have a favorite Neil Young song or album? "It's sort of all favorite," he says. "I like the older stuff better, which is typical with a lot of artists — hence the famous Ricky Nelson song 'Garden Party.' I like all his songs, you know, 'Rock and Roll' — just great stuff. His voice is perfect and haunting. He's 63 and I don't think it's changed. It's more important than his playing, 'cause you have so many great players — but there's just one voice like that. Whatever the hell 'it' is, he's got it."

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com