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Neil Young And Crazy Horse To Release Lost 2000 Album

April 1, 2008 3:30 PM ET

Neil Young and Crazy Horse are resurrecting their aborted 2000 album Toast for release sometime in the near future. Recorded at San Francisco's Toast Studios, the group worked for a few frustrating months on the disc before scrapping nearly all of it. According to a post on Young's website, the album's co-producer John Hanlon is at work mixing the songs. "Many songs share a bluesy, jazz-tinged vibe as a common thread," the post says. "Three solid rockers are interspersed in the mix. Other songs are long with extensive explorations between verses, a Crazy Horse trademark, kind of like a down-played Tonight's the Night, except these songs deal directly with love and loss, not drugs."

The item concludes with the news that "This first NYA 'Special Edition' is the beginning of a new series of unreleased albums." This begs some questions: Is he also going to release the fabled Homegrown (1975), Chrome Dreams (1977), Times Square (1989) and god knows what else is sitting in the vault? Isn't the box set supposed to come out this year? Why release these things separately? Anyway, for a good idea of what the Toast songs might be sound like, check out this killer performance of "Goin' Home" below. It's the only track to survive the sessions, and probably the best song he's put out in the past decade.

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