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Ne-Yo Signs On as VP of A&R for Motown

R&B star will serve as mentor to new artists

January 25, 2012 8:45 AM ET
Ne Yo
Ne-Yo at the SiriusXM Studio
Johnny Nunez/WireImage

R&B singer-songwriter Ne-Yo has signed a deal to bring his Compound Entertainment imprint to Motown Records, where he will release music and serve as the company's Senior Vice President of A&R. Ne-Yo's new gig will have him working as a producer, songwriter and mentor for the label's artists and charge him with seeking out new talent.

Ne-Yo, who had previously recorded for Def Jam in the Universal Music Group family of labels, is scheduled to release his fifth solo album this summer on Motown. "His track record of success at Def Jam will always be a benchmark," Universal Republic and Island Def Jam Motown CEO Barry Weiss said in a statement. "But this move to Motown will provide new and inspiring challenges for Ne-Yo as both an artist and a key member of the new senior management team that is taking form at the label in 2012."

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