.

Nashville Legend Cowboy Jack Clement Dead at 82

Wrote songs for Johnny Cash, produced Jerry Lee Lewis, Waylon Jennings and U2

August 8, 2013 1:20 PM ET
Cowboy Jack Clement
Cowboy Jack Clement
Michael Ochs Archives/Stringer

Cowboy Jack Clement, a legendary figure in Nashville as a producer, arranger, songwriter and performer, died this morning after battling liver cancer, The Tennessean reports. He was 82.

Elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame earlier this year, Clement leaves behind a remarkable legacy in country music. He was close friends with Johnny Cash, for whom he wrote "Guess Things Happen That Way" and arranged the horns on "Ring of Fire." At Sun Records in the 1950s, he was the first producer to record Roy Orbison and Jerry Lee Lewis. He helped integrate country music by introducing the singer Charley Pride, produced Waylon Jennings' outlaw classic Dreaming My Dreams and co-produced several tracks on U2's Rattle and Hum.   

100 Greatest Singers: Johnny Cash

Clement, who was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1973, was the subject of a 2005 documentary, Shakespeare Was a Big George Jones Fan. Most recently he was heard as a DJ on Sirius XM Satellite Radio's Outlaw Country channel on Saturday afternoons.

"One of my favorite people on the planet," Kris Kristofferson said recently of Clement. "An amazing character. Totally supportive of the right things in music, and funny on top of it."

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Vans”

The Pack | 2006

Berkeley, California rappers the Pack made their footwear choice clear in 2006 with the song "Vans." The track caught the attention of Too $hort, who signed them to his imprint. MTV refused to play the video for the song, though, claiming it was essentially a commercial for the product. Rapper Lil' B disagreed. "I didn’t know nobody [at] Vans," he said. "I was just a rapper who wore Vans." Even without MTV's support, Lil' B recognized the impact of the track. "God blessed me with such a revolutionary song… People around my age know who really started a lot of the dressing people are into now."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com