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NASA Reveals Mars Rover's Morning Mix

See which songs Curiosity has been waking up to each morning

August 16, 2012 5:40 PM ET
curiosity rover
The Martian landscape as photographed by the Mars Curiosity Rover.
Getty Images

During an Ask Me Anything (AMA) session on Reddit today, NASA researchers revealed the songs they use to wake up the Mars rover Curiosity each morning.

Eric Blood, who works in surface systems, unveiled an eclectic mix of rock classics, movie music and, of course, Wagner's "Ride of the Valkyries."

So far, Curiosity has woken up to the sweet sounds of the Beatles' "Good Morning Good Morning," "Good Morning" from Singing in the Rain, the Mission Impossible theme song, Anthrax's "Got the Time," the Doors' "Break on Through," Geroge Harrison's "Got My Mind Set on You," the Star Wars theme song (obviously), Simon and Garfunkel's  cover of the Everly Brothers' "Wake Up Little Susie" and, most recently, Frank Sinatra's "Come Fly With Me."

As one Redditor pointed out, the last two Mars rovers – Opportunity and Spirit, which landed on the red planet in 2004 – both received similar wake-up calls. You can check out their entire morning playlists here.

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