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Musicians Unions Avoiding Digital Rights Fight, For Now

July 21, 2008 12:50 PM ET

The fight over digital royalty payments that tore up Hollywood late last year could soon come to the music world. While musicians unions like AFM and AFTRA help artists by establishing minimal payments, seeking health insurance and negotiating contracts, the unions have avoided getting involved in the fight over digital rights and royalties. As of now, artists negotiate separate digital rights contracts with labels outside of the unions, but that could change in 2010, when the current AFTRA contract expires. When a new contract is drawn up, the unions can then pursue introducing widespread digital rights details into standardized contracts. Such an action could help prevent many of the lawsuits going now concerning digital rights, including a class action suit filed against Sony BMG by acts like the Allman Brothers and Cheap Trick over digital downloads and ringtones. "This period of time between 2008 and 2010 is a window of opportunity for artists to come together through their union to address an issue collectively that heretofore they have looked at as an individual issue," says AFTRA national executive director Kim Roberts Hedgpeth.

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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