.

Musicians Respond to Terror Tragedy

Bowie, Moby and others speak out on terrorist attacks

September 13, 2001 12:00 AM ET

In the wake of this week's terrorist attacks in New York, Washington D.C. and Pittsburgh, members of the music community have expressed their sorrow, sympathy and anger with their fans via their official Web sites. Here are some of their words:

David Bowie:

Like all of you, nothing has prepared me for the horrors of the last twenty-four hours. Like you, I never thought I would see anything like this in my lifetime. Our world will never be the same. The streets are empty downtown except for the few who live there, trancelike, going about their day to day lives, walking their dogs, going to work, or just walking. At some ghostly unseen signal everyone turns his or her heads, crane their necks, looking to the patch of sky where, twenty-four hours ago, the mountainous peaks of those two towers stood. The sunrise was seen earlier today. No obstruction.

The likelihood of survivors is paltry. Two friends of mine offered to give blood yesterday only to be told that it was not necessary, as there weren't going to be enough survivors to warrant it. A doctor, on his way to one of the makeshift morgues, suggested the victims would number many thousands. The emergency services are listening for the ring of cell phones or cries from the acres of rubble. When buildings of this size collapse, the cinder blocks sometimes form small pockets of space in the crush. It is possible some may survive this way.

The area of New York below fourteenth street has been declared a no-go section this morning. Lonely old sidewalk crazies, a permanent fixture of this city, who yesterday were crying aloud "where are all these people running to?'" are today asking, "where are all the people?"

Small mercies for me. My family and friends are safe. At this moment in time I have no personal knowledge that acquaintances or friends may have been killed. My heart goes out to those of you who do have family or friends missing. I hope beyond hope they are found.

Life here will continue. New Yorkers are a resilient and fast thinking people. In this way they really do resemble my own Londoners. They came together quickly in massive community support and silent determination. There has been no over-panicking. Over the next few days that calm may surely turn to anger. But today, there is just numbness, a horrible silence.

Tori Amos:

Those of you who are strong, need to be there for those who have lost someone today. We have to be here for each other right now.

Moby:

Everyone in New York is trying to cope, but none of us really know how. We pretend it's not real, but it is, and you can't avoid it for too long. None of us know who has died. We all know people who worked in those buildings or who lived nearby. So we wait. And cry. And drink. And get numb. And get angry. And get sad.

The toughest city in the world, but we have no idea how to deal with this. I'm not asking for extra sympathy for people who live in or near Manhattan, but just be understanding and patient with us. Please.

This Friday at 7pm there will be a candle-light vigil as an expression of compassion and solidarity for the victims of this tragedy. Please just light a candle and step outside for a few minutes at 7 pm this Friday. Please pass this message on to as many people as you can.

Weezer:

Like you, we've all been following the story of these horrifying acts of terrorism, and we are all just as stunned and shocked as you. Normal life stuff, including the very act of being in a touring rock band, seems incredibly strange. Everyone feels terrible for the victims of this, and a sense of frustrating anger over an inability to do anything about it.

R.E.M.:

What to say?

It's hard to know what to post on a day like this, definitely the saddest one any of us have ever experienced. On so many levels, our world is changed forever, and it was pretty shaky anyway. The office has been getting calls inquiring as to the guys and staff and we are all fine . . . other than the grief and sadness overwhelming everyone right now. Needless to say our thoughts, prayers and hearts go out to the many people horribly affected by the mindless violence yesterday.

Pantera:

There are no words worthy to express the sorrow we feel for those who lost loved ones in yesterday's terrible tragedy.

We have made the decision to cancel our participation in the upcoming "Tattoo the Planet" tour of Europe that was scheduled to begin tomorrow, Thursday, September 13.

We apologize to our international friends and fans that we planned on jamming and partying with, but there is absolutely nothing in the world worth compromising their safety or ours.

Aerosmith:

Our hearts and prayers go out to the injured and the families of those who perished. This country is all about freedom and we're proud to be an American band.

The Wallflowers:

In times like these, we are reminded of what is important in life. Our thoughts and support go out to those injured and to the families and friends of those lost in today's tragedies.

Our hearts and prayers go out to the injured and the families of those who perished. This country is all about freedom and we're proud to be an American band.

Saliva:

It's hard to explain how I feel, it's like an emotional rollercoaster; from feeling sad to angry to being sad again. As long as we trust in our faith and or love for each other as human beings then our country will see us through this tragic event. We're lucky enough to live inside the borders of the strongest superpower on Earth. My thoughts and prayers go out to all of the families and victims

American Hi-Fi:

In wake of last weeks tragic events, all of us in American Hi-Fi want to reach out and see how everyone is doing. The events touched us all, and our thoughts and prayers go to everyone who was personally affected by this horrible event.

We originally talked about cancelling our tour, realizing that playing seemed so trivial. But after we played a few shows, we decided that it was good to hava a place where people could come together and feel good for a while. Life must continue on and we need to return to as much of a state of mormalcy as possible. We hope that all of you are well and would love to see you at our shows. Rock and roll is good for the soul.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“San Francisco Mabel Joy”

Mickey Newbury | 1969

A country-folk song of epic proportions, "San Francisco Mabel Joy" tells the tale of a poor Georgia farmboy who wound up in prison after a move to the Bay Area found love turning into tragedy. First released by Mickey Newbury in 1969, it might be more familiar through covers by Waylon Jennings, Joan Baez and Kenny Rogers. "It was a five-minute song written in a two-minute world," Newbury said. "I was told it would never be cut by any artist ... I was told you could not use the term 'redneck' in a song and get it recorded."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com