.

Musician Started Bon Jovi Death Hoax

Pennsylvania man was frustrated the singer was focusing on business instead of music

December 28, 2011 2:45 PM ET
Jon Bon Jovi
Jon Bon Jovi attends the 'New Year's Eve' premiere at the Ziegfeld Theatre in New York City.
Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images

A Pennsylvania musician has admitted to starting the recent rumor about the death of Jon Bon Jovi through a friend's Twitter account. Jeffrey Goho told the Asbury Park Press that he was frustrated the rock star appeared to be concentrating on business endeavors that have nothing to do with music.

"All I heard was 'Bon Jovi this,' 'Bon Jovi's starting a restaurant,'" Goho told the paper. "What was the latest one? The Advil commercial? It was like, 'Jeez, [Bon Jovi] was a household name due to music, not business.'"

Goho said he has since come to understand that Bon Jovi's "household name" status has "made the tri-state area prosper, hence more musicians having more available places to go, more people to play to, and I was quite wrong."

He's gotten some backlash for the incident, he said, but has also gained some fans. "None of this was expected, so I'm not going to sit here and complain about it," said Goho, "but it wasn't my initial intention. I never really thought it would get out of the state of Pennsylvania."

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Stillness Is the Move”

Dirty Projectors | 2009

A Wim Wenders film and a rapper inspired the Dirty Projectors duo David Longstreth and Amber Coffmanto write "sort of a love song." "We rented the movie Wings of Desire from Dave's brother's recommendation, and he had me go through it and just write down some things that I found interesting, and they made it into the song," Coffman said. As for the hip-hop connection, Longstreth explained, "The beat is based on T-Pain. We commissioned a radio mix of the song by the guy who mixes all of Timbaland's records, but the mix we made sounded way better, so we didn't use it."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com