.

MTV Rethinking War Clips

Videos by System and OutKast deemed possibly insensitive

March 26, 2003 12:00 AM ET

Citing "heightened public sensitivity" because of the war in Iraq, MTV Europe is avoiding videos and programs deemed "offensive to public feeling." A network memo written by Broadcast Standards Manager Mark Sunderland recommends a temporary embargo of videos that depict, "war, soldiers, war planes, bombs, missiles, riots and social unrest, executions [and] other obviously sensitive material."

Among the videos the memo mentions are OutKast's "B.O.B," which stands for "Bombs over Baghdad," System of a Down's "Boom!," which contains war-protest footage, and anything by the B-52's, because the band's name is also a type of bomber plane.

Other videos on the list of examples include Aerosmith's "Don't Want to Miss a Thing," which contains footage from the movie Armageddon, Bon Jovi's "This Ain't a Love Song," and Radiohead's "Lucky."

"It's not a ban," says a spokesman for MTV's international divisions. "It didn't come from programming. We're complying with ITC guidelines on good taste, to avoid offending public feeling." ITC is a communications regulatory board based in Britain.

According to a spokesman for MTV USA, the memo doesn't apply in the United States. "We're not banning anything," he says. "We're being sensitive to the situation, in general and on a case-by-case basis."

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Bird on a Wire”

Leonard Cohen | 1969

While living on the Greek island of Hydra, Cohen was battling a lingering depression when his girlfriend handed him a guitar and suggested he play something. After spotting a bird on a telephone wire, Cohen wrote this prayer-like song of guilt. First recorded by Judy Collins, it would be performed numerous times by artists incuding Johnny Cash, Joe Cocker and Rita Coolidge. "I'm always knocked out when I hear my songs covered or used in some situation," Cohen told Rolling Stone. "I've never gotten over the fact that people out there like my music."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com