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Motorhead's Lemmy Unveils 'Anti-Beats' Headphones at CES

Rocker wanted less bass and more mid-range sounds

Lemmy holds up a pair of Motorheadphones
RD/ Kabik/ Retna Digital
January 9, 2013 2:50 PM ET

Motorhead frontman Lemmy Kilmister today unveiled Motorheadphones, a new line of branded headphones designed for rock fans and musicians, at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Billboard reports.

"People say we've never sold out," joked Lemmy during the launch. "No one ever approached us." 

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The headphones were specifically designed to bring out midrange sounds unlike other high-end headphones like Beats, which place an emphasis on bass. Brand manager Andres Nicklassen – who initially approached Motorhead about the headphones with CEO Ulf Sandberg – said that too much bass takes the soul out of rock. Or, as Lemmy put it, "It's like you're listening through a towel."

Motorheadphones are made of all metal and will be available in three different over-ear designs and six in-ear models, with prices for the latter ranging between $49.99 and $59.99, and $99.99 to $129.99 for the former. Most of the headphones will be smart-phone ready, with two models coming with a recently developed microphone remote control called the "Controlizer." 

Motorheadphones have been available in Europe since last fall, and they'll start shipping in the U.S. in April.

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