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Motorhead Urge Fans Not to Buy Box Set

Lemmy says the band has no control over early work

Lemmy Kilmeister of Motorhead performs at the Aragon Ballroom in Chicago.
Lyle A. Waisman/FilmMagic
February 22, 2012 8:40 AM ET

Motörhead frontman Lemmy Kilmister is urging fans not to purchase The Complete Early Years, a 15-disc box set compiling the band's music that is being sold for over $600. "Unfortunately greed once again rears its yapping head," Kilmister wrote on the band's official website. "I would advise against it even for the most rabid completists!"

Kilmister claimed the band has no control over what is done with this early material, and he urged fans to consider buying their latest album, The Wörld Is Yours and a new DVD, The Wörld Is Ours Vol. 1 – Everywhere Further Than Everyplace Else, rather than "this outrageously expensive box set."

Photos: Random Notes

The Complete Early Years was recently issued by PID. The set includes the band's first eight albums, seven CD singles, pins, posters and a photo book inside a light-up skull package.

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