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Morrissey: Norwegian Massacre Not As Bad As McDonalds and KFC

Singer's angry comments lead to backlash on Twitter

July 28, 2011 5:05 PM ET
Morrissey Norway
Morrissey said the death toll from the Norway attacks was "nothing compared to what happens in McDonald’s and Kentucky Fried shit every day"
Annabel Staff/Redferns/Getty Images

Morrissey has reportedly compared the recent massacre of 76 people in Norway by the Christian extremist Anders Behring Breivik to the slaughter of animals for fast food chains. "We all live in a murderous world, as the events in Norway have shown," the singer told an audience in Warsaw, Poland on Sunday, according to the Daily Mirror. "Though that is nothing compared to what happens in McDonalds and Kentucky Fried shit every day."

Photos: Random Notes

The former Smiths frontman's comments has led to a harsh backlash, with angry responses turning up on fan sites and Twitter. This is only the latest in a long series of harsh statements against animal cruelty from the outspoken vegetarian. In September, the singer triggered outrage by calling the Chinese a "sub-species" because of that culture's attitude regarding animal welfare.

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