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More Coachella Lineup Rumors Include Daft Punk, Phoenix

Supposed Songkick e-mail lists big names for next year's fest

Daft Punk/The Rolling Stones
Mick Hutson/Redferns; Kevin Mazur/WireImage
December 18, 2012 10:55 AM ET

The Coachella 2013 rumor mill continues to churn out possible headliners for next year's festivities, with Pretty Much Amazing posting a screen-cap of an e-mail from the social concert-calendar site Songkick, which added Daft Punk, Yeah Yeah Yeahs and Phoenix to speculation that has already included the Rolling Stones.

Coachella 2012: Rolling Stone's Complete Coverage

Whether the supposed e-mail alert was a total fake, or perhaps just a really bad goof is unclear (though for what its worth, Phoenix do have a new album slated for potential release next spring).

The Stones sparked Coachella talk themselves last week when a show listed for April 12th popped in the tour section of their mobile app. The date was  quickly removed, though not before fans snapped screen grabs.

Back in October, Keith Richards hinted to Rolling Stone that it was possible the Stones' 50th Anniversary celebration would continue into 2013: "My experience with the Rolling Stones is that once the juggernaut starts rolling, it ain't gonna stop. So without sort of saying definitely yes – yeah. We ain't doing all this for four gigs!"

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Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

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