Moby Rejects Offer to DJ at Trump Inauguration Ball

Musician, who called Trump "actual sociopath," creates hypothetical playlist filled with protest music for inauguration ball

Moby, who called Donald Trump an "actual sociopath" in a 'Rolling Stone' op-ed, turned down an offer to DJ at one of Trump's inauguration ball. Credit: Randy Shropshire/Getty

Moby, who called Donald Trump an "actual sociopath" in an op-ed piece he penned for Rolling Stone, has turned down an inexplicable offer to DJ at one of Trump's inauguration ball.

The artist revealed on Instagram Monday that a booking agent approached him recently to see whether the electronic musician would be open to providing music for an inauguration event, despite Moby's well-known support of Hillary Clinton and distaste for Trump.

"Hahahahaha, I was just asked by a booking agent if I would consider djing at one of the inaugural balls for #trump...," Moby wrote. "Hahahahaha, wait, Hahahaha, really? I guess I'd DJ at an inaugural ball if as payment #trump released his tax returns… So #trump what do you think, I DJ for you and you release your tax returns?"

Keeping with the spirit of the unlikely offer, Billboard asked Moby to construct a hypothetical playlist that he would spin at the inaugural ball, with Moby handpicking protest anthems like Neil Young's "Ohio," Public Enemy's "Fight the Power," Bob Dylan's "Masters of War" and Pete Seeger's "We Shall Overcome."

Trump's inauguration team is having difficulty drawing A-list talent for the January 20th event, with only the Rockettes (begrudgingly), the Mormon Tabernacle Church Choir (also reluctantly), Big & Rich and America's Got Talent singer Jackie Evancho signing up for the inauguration.

In November, days before Election Day, Moby warned in his Rolling Stone op-ed, "[A Trump presidency would be] death by 1,000 Republican cuts. It basically gives the NRA the ability to write gun policy. It gives the coal industry and the oil industry the ability to write energy policy. It's handing the keys to people who want to advance policy measures that are just — again, I try and be diplomatic, but they're trying to advance policy measures to protect their corporate interests or protect their personal interests but to the egregious detriment of our country."

From his early beginnings as a DJ to the release of ‘Animal Rights,’ here are the things we learned from Moby’s memoir. Watch here.