.

Mobb Deep Get Hand From 50 Cent

Havoc and Prodigy join the G Unit squad

February 15, 2006 12:47 PM ET

Getting dropped by Jive Records was the best thing that ever happened to Mobb Deep: A week after the call last March from Jive, 50 Cent invited the duo -- rapper-producer Havoc and rapper Prodigy -- to sign with G Unit, and gave his fellow Queens, New York, natives a pair of Porsches. "That was the bait that got me," Havoc says. They set to work on their new album, Blood Money, due March 21st.

The hardcore vets were pleased to find that they had a good working relationship with 50, despite some bad blood. (On last year's "Piggy Bank," 50 told Jadakiss, "I'll do your little ass like Jay did Mobb Deep" -- a reference to Jay-Z's famously brutal dis on "Takeover.") "It was just like being around our homeys," says Havoc. "He made us feel so comfortable, he just pulled us right in." Havoc produced most of the disc, including the Knight Rider-sampling track "Night Riders."

For the Dr. Dre-produced "Nightmares," 50 sings a hook he conceived after being awoken in the middle of the night on a trip to Africa, and Prodigy adds verses about a recurring dream. "It's about protecting myself from being shot," he says. "But when I go to use the gun, I can't pull the trigger."

The duo -- partners since high school and longtime roommates -- says 50 was an inspiration. "He's like a robot in the studio," says Prodigy. "We competin' with the best."

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Nightshift”

The Commodores | 1984

The year after soul legends Marvin Gaye and Jackie Wilson died, songwriter Dennis Lambert asked members of the Commodores to give him a tape of ideas. "And the one from Walter Orange has this wonderful bass line," said co-writer Franne Golde. "Plus the lyric, 'Marvin, he was a friend of mine' ... Within 10 minutes, we had decided it should be something like a modern R&B version of 'Rock 'n' Roll Heaven,' and I just said, 'Nightshift.'" This tribute to the recently deceased musicians was the band's only hit without Lionel Richie, who had left for a solo career.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com