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Mindy McCready Autopsy Report Confirms Suicide

Troubled country singer was found dead on February 17th

Mindy McCready in New York City.
Brad Barket/Getty Images
February 20, 2013 12:20 PM ET

A preliminary autopsy report confirms that Mindy McCready's death was a suicide, The Associated Press reports. The troubled country singer was found dead on February 17th from a gunshot wound to the head that Arkansas authorities say was self-inflicted. She was 37.

Mindy McCready: A Look at Her Troubled, Too-Short Timeline

The singer was found on the same porch where her boyfriend, David Wilson, was discovered after an apparent suicide in January. Wilson was the father of McCready's youngest son. Investigators are treating Wilson's death as a suicide but have yet to determine an official cause of death.

McCready landed her first Number One hit in 1996 when she was 20 with "Guys Do It All The Time." She released Ten Thousand Angels that year, and racked up 2 million in sales for the album. But alcohol, drug and legal problems derailed her career, and she later appeared on Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew in 2010. She entered rehab for treatment for alcohol and mental health issues earlier this month, and was reportedly not coping well with Wilson's death.

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Song Stories

“Try a Little Tenderness”

Otis Redding | 1966

This pop standard had been previously recorded by dozens of artists, including by Bing Crosby 33 years before Otis Redding, who usually wrote his own songs, cut it. It was actually Sam Cooke’s 1964 take, which Redding’s manager played for Otis, that inspired the initially reluctant singer to take on the song. Isaac Hayes, then working as Stax Records’ in-house producer, handled the arrangement, and Booker T. and the MG’s were the backing band. Redding’s soulful version begins quite slowly and tenderly itself before mounting into a rousing, almost religious “You’ve gotta hold her, squeeze her …” climax. “I did that damn song you told me to do,” Redding told his manager. “It’s a brand new song now.”

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