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Miley Cyrus Talks Drugs and Alcohol

'I think alcohol is way more dangerous than marijuana'

June 18, 2013 4:30 PM ET
Miley Cyrus
Miley Cyrus
Jason LaVeris/FilmMagic

A few years ago, Miley Cyrus learned firsthand the perils of unguarded moments in the digital age when video surfaced of her using a bong, supposedly to smoke a legal substance called salvia – an incident she later spoofed on Saturday Night Live. While the pop singer doesn't exactly cop to smoking pot in a new interview with Rolling Stone's Rob Tannenbaum, she doesn't deny it, either.

Stars Go Punk at Met Gala: Miley Cyrus

"I did a song with Snoop Dogg called 'Ashtrays and Heartbreaks,' so people can put it together for themselves," Cyrus says. "I think alcohol is way more dangerous than marijuana – people can be mad at me for saying that, but I don't care. I've seen a lot of people spiral down with alcohol, but I've never seen that happen with weed."

Marijuana users tend to be more laid-back, Cyrus observes, noting, "As long as it isn't illegal, there are far more dangerous things. And it's legal in the state of California. So I'm happy to live in California, a place where you can be whoever you want to be."

Pot isn't the only illicit substance Cyrus discusses: there's molly, too. The form of ecstasy has popped up in hip-hop this year, to the chagrin of Rick Ross and the disgust of Kendrick Lamar. The way Cyrus pronounces a word in her new song "We Can't Stop" has prompted speculation that she's singing about molly, though she insists she says "Miley."

"I have an accent! So when I say 'Miley,' it must sound like 'molly,'" she says. "You're not allowed to say 'molly' on the radio, so it obviously says 'Miley.' I knew people were gonna wonder what I'm saying in that song."

Not that "Miley" is free of drug connotations, either. "People refer to [cocaine] as 'Miley Cyrus,'" she says, citing Ross' verse on Meek Mills' song "Believe It." "My name is used in hip-hop songs to mean that. So even if I'm saying 'Miley,' people could still find something wrong with it."

The full Q&A with Cyrus will be available in the July 4th summer double issue of Rolling Stone.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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