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Mick Jagger Will Perform with Foo Fighters, Arcade Fire on 'SNL'

Rolling Stones star will also host the episode

May 11, 2012 1:15 PM ET
mick jagger
Mick Jagger attends the 'Schiaparelli and Prada: Impossible Conversations' Costume Institute Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
Kevin Mazur/WireImage

Mick Jagger will be joined by Arcade Fire and Foo Fighters when he performs on the season finale of Saturday Night Live on May 19th, Entertainment Weekly reports. It's unclear what Jagger will sing with the two bands, but odds are good that he will revisit Rolling Stones classics to celebrate his band's 50th anniversary.

Jagger will be the host of the episode as well as the musical guest. Jagger has never hosted the program on his own, though he shared that duty with the rest of the Rolling Stones back in 1978. Arcade Fire and Foo Fighters are no strangers to the program either: the Canadian rock collective has been a musical guest twice, and Foo frontman Dave Grohl has performed on the show 10 times previously with the Foo Fighters, Nirvana, Them Crooked Vultures and Tom Petty.

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