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Michael Jackson to Appear on Pepsi Cans

Soda company celebrating the 25th anniversary of 'Bad'

May 4, 2012 8:40 AM ET
mj pepsi
PepsiCo

Pepsi has struck a deal with the Michael Jackson estate to create a series of soda cans featuring an image of the late pop icon. One billion cans celebrating the 25th anniversary of Jackson's album Bad will be produced around the world as part of the soft drink company's Live for Now campaign. Pepsi has also worked with Sony Music and the Jackson estate to create new mixes of songs from Bad to share with fans as part of this project. In addition to normal cans, there will also be limited-edition 16 oz. cans bearing the singer's image.

Michael Jackson's relationship with Pepsi dates back to 1984, when the singer and other members of the Jacksons filmed an ad for the soda company. Jackson was injured in the shoot, and was treated for second-degree burns on his scalp after pyrotechnics accidentally lit his hair on fire. Jackson never fully recovered from this incident, and he won a $1.5 million settlement from Pepsi, which he donated to the Brotman Medical Center in Culver City, California. It has since been renamed the Michael Jackson Burn Center.

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