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Michael Jackson Doctor Seeks Appeal for Manslaughter Conviction

Dr. Conrad Murray says King of Pop died as a result of financial stress

Dr. Conrad Murray sits in court after he was sentenced for the involuntary manslaughter of singer Michael Jackson.
Mario Anzuoni-Pool/Getty Images
February 23, 2012 11:03 AM ET

Dr. Conrad Murray, the physician convicted of involuntary manslaughter in the death of Michael Jackson, has filed legal documents seeking an appeal for his case.

According to the documents filed in Los Angeles, Murray claims that Jackson was so stressed out over his financial difficulties that he self-administered the dose of the sedative Propofol that killed him in 2009.

"[Jackson] was on the verge of losing his entire estate to foreclosure. The pressure to fight through his insomnia, to rehearse and be the entertainer he was in his earlier years was overwhelming," Murray's lawyers wrote. "His motivation and resulting desperation were relevant to show a likelihood or reason to act in a manner inconsistent with good judgment."

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