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Michael Jackson Doctor Moved to Tears by Testimony

Former patients praise Conrad Murray in court

October 27, 2011 8:45 AM ET
Deputy District Attorney David  Walgren hands Ruby Mosley, character witness and former patient of Dr. Conrad Murray, a statement during her testimony in Murray's involuntary manslaughter trial in the death of singer Michael Jackson
Deputy District Attorney David Walgren hands Ruby Mosley, character witness and former patient of Dr. Conrad Murray, a statement during her testimony in Murray's involuntary manslaughter trial in the death of singer Michael Jackson
Paul Buck-Pool/Getty Images

Dr. Conrad Murray, the physician on trial for involuntary manslaughter in the death of Michael Jackson, was moved to tears in court yesterday following testimony from five former patients who spoke well of his character and medical skills. Murray broke down during the testimony of Ruby Mosley, an elderly woman who shot down the notion that he was motivated by greed by recognizing his work at the Acres Home, where he opened a clinic in his father's memory for senior citizens on fixed incomes.

Other character witnesses called to the stand yesterday were patients who credited Murray with saving their lives. "I'm alive today because of that man," said Andrew Guest of Las Vegas. "That man sitting there is the best doctor I've ever seen."

Related
Timeline: The Trial of Dr. Conrad Murray
Photos: Michael Jackson Remembered
Photos: Michael Jackson's Funeral

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