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Method Man: Ol' Dirty Bastard Stole Rhymes

Rapper allegedly lifted verses from RZA, GZA on debut album

October 19, 2011 5:55 PM ET
 Ghostface Killah, Masta Killa, Raekwon, RZA, Ol' Dirty Bastard, GZA, U-God and Method Man pose for a portrait in New York City, New York, April 1997.
Ghostface Killah, Masta Killa, Raekwon, RZA, Ol' Dirty Bastard, GZA, U-God and Method Man pose for a portrait in New York City, New York, April 1997.
Bob Berg/Getty Images

The late Wu-Tang Clan rapper Ol' Dirty Bastard stole most of the lyrics on his debut album, Return to the 36 Chambers: The Dirty Version, from fellow Wu-Tang members, says Wu emcee Method Man. "The majority of the verses on that album are old RZA rhymes and GZA rhymes," Method Man told Complex. "Dirty took all their shit and made it his own, and GZA ain’t say shit. Most of [Dirty’s verses] was GZA’s shit. I remember GZA and ODB got in an argument one night and GZA was like, ‘Nigga most of that shit on your fucking album is mines anyway!’"

Photos: Random Notes
"ODB wrote ‘Brooklyn Zoo’ though," says Method Man. "I could go through the discography, I could tell you which ones he wrote. Like ‘Dog Shit’ on Wu-Tang Forever? ‘Calling me a dog/But leave a dog alone/Because nothing can stop me from burying my bones’ – I wrote that when I was 15 years old."

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