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Metallica Reveal "Death Magnetic" Track List

July 23, 2008 12:48 PM ET

After a sheet music website accidentally revealed (and then deleted) the track list for Metallica's Death Magnetic earlier today, the band confirmed the ten songs that will appear on their Rick Rubin-produced album, due out in September. One title immediately jumps out: "The Unforgiven III," following the Metallica's "The Unforgiven" and roughly 11 years after ReLoad's "The Unforgiven II." The rest of the song titles are packed with common Metallica-esque themes of nightmares, suicides and the apocalypse. There's also a song called "The End of the Line," which shares its title with a Traveling Wilburys song, but we're assuming it's not a cover. Despite reports from earlier in the day, there's no track called "Death Magnetic" included. The album isn't due out for another two months, so you still have plenty of time to figure out if you want these ten songs delivered to you in a coffin box and sufficiently prepare yourself to play "Broken, Beat & Scarred" on Guitar Hero III.

"That Was Just Your Life"
"The End Of The Line"
"Broken, Beat & Scarred"
"The Day That Never Comes"
"All Nightmare Long"
"Cyanide"
"The Unforgiven III"
"The Judas Kiss"
"Suicide & Redemption"
"My Apocalypse"

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