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Merle Haggard Preparing to Tour Again

Country legend ready to 'get back on the bus' after double pneumonia scare

February 9, 2012 11:45 AM ET
Merle Haggard performs at the Greek Theatre in Los Angeles.
Merle Haggard performs at the Greek Theatre in Los Angeles.
Noel Vasquez/Getty Images

Country legend Merle Haggard is set to hit the road again after a bout with double pneumonia that cut short his tour in January. After being rushed to the hospital in Macon, Georgia, the singer underwent several procedures to address other ailments, including three stomach ulcers, polyps on his colon and diverticulitis in his esophagus. On his website, he thanked the people of Macon "for probably saving my life."

Several postponed dates have been rescheduled for April and Haggard will make previously scheduled appearances beginning February 28th in Tucson, Arizona. "I'm feeling good and ready to get back on the bus," the singer said in a statement. "Thanks to all for their powerful prayers that led to my speedy recovery. I'm rehearsing with the band and looking forward to playin' and singin' again." Haggard is currently supporting his latest album, Working in Tennessee.

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