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Mellencamp, Young and Matthews Bring Farm Aid to New England

July 15, 2008 11:42 AM ET

John Mellencamp has revealed the details of this year's Farm Aid concert, to be held September 20th at the Comcast Center in Mansfield, Massachusetts. Mellencamp will be joined by co-headliners Neil Young, Dave Matthews and Willie Nelson, with more top artists to be announced soon. This year also marks the first time in the event's history that the concert will take place in the New England area. "New England was built on the strength of independent family farmers," said Mellencamp. "We can honor that independent spirit by joining Farm Aid to grow the movement that is changing the way all of America eats." As in years past, the concert will "feature family-farm identified, local and organic foods at concessions, setting an example of the many ways that family farm food can be integrated into the general marketplace." Since its creation in 1985, Farm Aid has helped raise over $30 million for programs that support farmers, expand the Good Food Movement and promote food from family farms. Tickets for this year's Farm Aid, which is presented by Whole Foods Market and Horizon Organic, go on sale July 28th via Ticketmaster.

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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